Dried Fig Cookies

These dried fig cookies are soft, chewy, and subtly sweet. They’re loaded with flavor and are perfect when you’re in the mood for a nutrient-dense treat. These delicious cookies are dairy free, egg free, and vegan.

What to serve with these dried fig cookies

If you’re making these cookies for a party and would like another nutritious treat to offer your guests, try these date-sweetened peanut butter cookies. They’re sweet with a hint of saltiness.

Six dried fig cookies on a white plate.

Main ingredients and substitutions

Dried figs give these cookies a unique flavor and satisfying texture. No added sugar is needed in this recipe since the figs are quite sweet. Figs are loaded with fiber and many essential nutrients, so these cookies are perfect if you prefer nutrient-dense treats.

I like to use whole grain flour when making these dried fig cookies. Whole wheat flour or spelt flour work well, but you can substitute all purpose flour if you prefer.

Smooth almond butter acts as a binder and adds richness to these egg-free, dairy-free cookies. You can substitute any other type of nut butter or seed butter you prefer. Just be sure to use a variety with no added sugar or salt.

Vanilla extract complements the flavor of the figs in this recipe nicely. Be sure to use pure vanilla extract as opposed to artificial vanilla flavoring if possible.

I drizzled some melted dairy-free white chocolate on top of the cookies, but you can use any type of chocolate you prefer. Or you can skip the chocolate drizzle – these cookies are delicious either way.

How to make them

Start by removing the stems from the dried figs, then roughly chop the figs. Next you’ll add the chopped figs and boiling water to a bowl, ensuring that they are fully submerged, then let the figs soak in the water for 30 minutes.

Chopped figs soaking in water in a glass bowl.

When the figs have finished soaking, preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Add the figs and soaking liquid to a food processor or blender, along with the smooth almond butter, vanilla extract, and salt.

Figs, water, almond butter, vanilla, and salt in a food processor.

Blend until smooth.

Blended fig mixture in a food processor.

Add the whole wheat flour and baking powder to a mixing bowl, then mix well. Next you’ll add the blended fig mixture to the mixing bowl, then use your hands to mix and knead the ingredients together until a dough is formed (the dough will be sticky, so wear kitchen gloves if you prefer).

Fig dough in a glass mixing bowl.

Use your hands to roll the dough into 12 evenly sized balls and place them, evenly spaced, on two sheet pans lined with parchment paper (six balls per pan).

Fig dough balls on a sheet pan lined with parchment paper.

Use your fingers to flatten the dough balls into circle shapes.

Raw cookies made with figs on a sheet pan lined with parchment paper.

Bake at 375 degrees Fahrenheit for 17 minutes.

Baked cookies made with figs on a sheet pan lined with parchment paper.

Optional step: after the cookies have finished baking and have cooled to room temperature, drizzle some melted chocolate on top of the cookies, then place them in the fridge for 30 minutes to let the chocolate harden before serving.

Cookies drizzled with dairy-free white chocolate on a sheet pan.

Storage and freezing

Store these dried fig cookies in an airtight container in the fridge for up to three days, or freeze them for up to six months, then thaw at room temperature before serving.

White chocolate drizzled cookies made with figs on a white plate.

More nutritious cookie recipes to try

Dried Fig Cookies

These dried fig cookies are soft, chewy, and subtly sweet. They're perfect when you're in the mood for a delicious, nutrient-dense treat.
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 17 minutes
Soaking Time 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 2 minutes
Servings 12
Calories 120kcal

Equipment

  • Food processor or blender.
  • 2 Sheet pans
  • Parchment paper

Ingredients

  • 12 dried figs
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour (or substitute spelt flour)
  • 3/4 cup boiling water
  • 1/2 cup smooth almond butter (at room temperature)
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Optional ingredient: melted chocolate for drizzling on the cookies (I used dairy-free white chocolate)

Instructions

  • Remove the stems from the dried figs, then roughly chop the figs.
  • Add the chopped figs and boiling water to a bowl, ensuring that they are fully submerged, then let the figs soak in the water for 30 minutes.
  • When the figs have finished soaking, preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Add the figs and soaking liquid to a food processor or blender.
  • Add the smooth almond butter, vanilla extract, and salt to the food processor or blender, then blend until smooth.
  • Add the whole wheat flour and baking powder to a mixing bowl then mix well.
  • Add the blended fig mixture to the mixing bowl, then use your hands to mix and knead the ingredients together until a dough is formed (the dough will be sticky, so wear kitchen gloves if you prefer).
  • Use your hands to roll the dough into 12 evenly sized balls and place them, evenly spaced, on two sheet pans lined with parchment paper (six balls per pan).
  • Use your fingers to flatten the dough balls into circle shapes.
  • Bake at 375 degrees Fahrenheit for 17 minutes.
  • Optional step: after the cookies have finished baking and have cooled to room temperature, drizzle some melted chocolate on top of the cookies, then place them in the fridge for 30 minutes to let the chocolate harden before serving.

Notes

  • Store these dried fig cookies in an airtight container in the fridge for up to three days, or freeze them for up to six months, then thaw at room temperature before serving.

Nutrition

Serving: 1Cookie | Calories: 120kcal | Carbohydrates: 14.4g | Protein: 3.8g | Fat: 6.1g | Saturated Fat: 0.5g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1.6g | Monounsaturated Fat: 3.4g | Sodium: 86.3mg | Potassium: 169.7mg | Fiber: 2.9g | Sugar: 4.4g | Vitamin A: 1.8IU | Vitamin C: 0.1mg | Calcium: 72.6mg | Iron: 0.9mg

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